3 Must-See Valentine Cards Of All Time

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Did you know that Valentine’es card has an evolution? During the 15th century, poems are the familiar form of romantic greetings. Then the first Valentine’s Card printed was published on 12th January 1797 by John Fairburn of 146, Minories, London. The card has been peirced to achieve lace effect, and is decorated with doves, flowers and cupids. This card was sent by Catherine Mossday to Mr Brown of Dover Place, Kent Road, London.

1.First Valentine’s Card

“Since on this ever Happy day,
All Nature’s full of Love and Play
Yet harmless still if my design,
‘Tis but to be your Valentine.”

Inside includes the message:

Mr Brown,

As I have repeatedly requested you to come I think you must have some reason for not complying with my request, but as I have something particular to say to you I could wish you make it all agreeable to come on Sunday next without fail and in doing you will oblige your well wisher.

Catherine Mossday

2.Victorian Card

The industrialization of Britain in the 19th-century brought advances in the printing and production of Valentine’s Cards. During this era, hearts may be in used but unlikely like today. Remarkable Jonathan King (comprehensive card collection at least 1,000 cards) created huge card boasts layer after layer of lace, decorated with embroidery, beads, ribbons and shells for the woman he loved.

He also have a leap year card. The legend suggests that 29th is a day when women may propose to men, and London’s valentine creators sold cards for the purpose.

3.Mid-19th Century Valentine’s Card

The Valentine’s card rapidly gained popularity in America, where they were initially advertised as a British fashion. Hallmark Cards first produced their Valentine’s card during 1913, representing a success of commercialisation of Valentine’s Day.

Photo Caption: The left card represented the US market, the right card for the British market. (Sarah Fabian-Baddiel/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

We also have 1950s, 1970s or the whole 19th century cards.

There’s even a 90’s X-MEN Valentine Cards for types of love.

Now we have the 21st century Valentine’s Day Cards. They’re simpler and some are unconventional yet creative.

Stay tuned for more interesting articles from Collectors Hive. As hobbyists/collectors, we put value and recognition on collectibles.

 

Sources:
http://blog.museumoflondon.org.uk/leap-year-cards/http://www.historyextra.com/period/roman/a-brief-history-of-valentines-day-cards/http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/L1NM_6mWRymAMKXcRDlXJAhttp://www.slowfamilyonline.com/2013/02/vintage-valentines/http://www.vintagevalentinemuseum.com/
http://www.retro-daze.org/site/article/id/169
http://www.sickchirpse.com
Notonthehighstreet.com

 

 

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